The Hiatus is Over

I will be updating and adding more content to this blog very soon!

 

 

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March 26th – News Wrap Up

Top Stories from Today —

Trump hits the golf course for the 13th time (Time)

Pakistani al-Qaeda leader killed in US strike in Afghanistan (NPR)

Trump to undo Obama plan to curb climate change (Boston Globe)

Protests in over 100 cities in Russia; top Putin critic arrested (NYT)

Congressman resigns from Freedom Caucus after healthcare drama (WA Post)

A rocket, a rover, and a moon: this week in space (ExtremeTech)

United Airlines denied entry on United flight for wearing leggings (KREM)

Nancy Johnson – Revolutionized Ice Cream

At a time before freezers were invented, Nancy Johnson invented the first hand-crank ice cream freezer. 

She patented her invention and sold the rights to wholesaler William Young who started marketing her invention in 1848. 

Because of her invention, ice cream became less of chore, and became faster and easier to make! 

Source

March 24th – News Wrap Up

Top Stories from Today —

Republicans yank Obamacare repeal bill (Politico)

Lawmakers call on FBI to help find missing girls in Washington DC (abc7.Com)

US investigating Mosul strike that killed up to 200 civilians (NYT)

Keystone XL pipeline would only create 35 permanent jobs (CNN Money)

Comet Pizza gunman pleads guilty to federal and local charges (WA Post)

 

 

Shirley Chisholm – First Black Congresswoman

“If they don’t give you a seat at the table, bring a folding chair.”

Before Barack Obama, and before Hillary Clinton, there was Shirley Chisholm.

She served in the New York State Assembly, then made history in 1968 by being elected the first black woman elected to the US Congress. 

Shirley championed a bill to ensure domestic workers got benefits, advocated for better access to education, fought for immigrant rights, and more. 

She also worked tirelessly to expand government funded food programs which built the foundation for WIC. 

Shirley ran for president under the Democratic ticket in 1972. Her slogan, “Unbought and unbossed.”

She survived several assination attempts during her campaign and sued for the right to debate on television. She made it all the way to the Democratic National Convention but lost the nomination to George McGovern. 

Learn more here.

March 23rd – News Wrap Up

Top Stories from Today —

Trump to House Republicans: pass healthcare bill on Friday or he’ll move on (WA Post)

All-male White House health bill photo sparks anger (BBC)

The Senate voted to undo rules covering your internet privacy (WA Post)

Lawmakers demand information on Flynn’s Russian ties (CNN)

Democrats plan to filibuster to thwart Gorsuch nomination (NYT)

Taliban take an Afghan district, Sangin, that many Marines died to keep (NYT)
NASA Hubble telescope discovers the first ‘runaway’ black hole (engadget) 

New view of dinosaurs could radically reshape their family tree (LA Times) 

Bertha “Birdie” Parker – First Female Native American Archaeologist

Of Abenaki and Seneca decent, Bertha was born in New York in 1907. Her father was an archeologist and the first president of the Society of American Archaeology. In 1914, she moved to LA with her mother and she performed in the Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus as a teenager. 

She began her archaeological work with her uncle. In 1929, she was at the excavation site for the Mesa House and discovered a Pueblo site which she named “Scorpion Hill.” She excavated the site herself, and her documents and photos were exhibited in the Southwest Museum in LA.

Three years later, Bertha worked at Gypsum Cave site in Nevada. There she discovered Corn Creek after she found a camel bone sticking out of an eroding lake bed. 

Since she was smaller than her colleagues, she was able to access new areas. Bertha found ancient human tools, and more importantly, the skull of an extinct giant ground sloth. 

She worked as an Assistant in Archaeology at the Southwest Museum from 1931-1941 and published several archaeology and ethnology papers. 

In later years, she became a technical advisor and consultant on TV shows and movies depicting Native Americans. She even hosted her own show about Native history and folklore throughout the 1950s. 

Source